mynetdiary-blog:

Be An Olympian (Kind Of) with Simple Sports Nutrition
As teams representing their countries compete for gold in London, now is the time to consider the dedication each puts into his or her sport. Training hard is just one aspect of becoming an elite athlete capable of the high-level competition that is the Olympics. Another is proper nutrition and dieting. 
In honor of the London 2012 Summer Olympics, here is a short rundown on how to fuel yourself as an athlete. 
Diversity - The more diverse and balanced diet you can eat, the better your body will fare. You mustn’t skip meals, and remember that carbohydrates, fats and proteins all have a place in your diet. Make sure you’re getting enough of each. 
Several hours before your workout you should have an easily digestible meal. Depending on when you work out, it may mean a light lunch (salad + protein) or a light breakfast (an egg with toast). You should also hydrate throughout the day.
A half hour before your workout is the time to eat a small snack and drink more water. Trail mix is good if you’re planning a workout longer than an hour. For shorter workouts, a banana is a fine choice. 
During your workout, it’s all about staying hydrated. A good rule of thumb is to drink 8 oz. of fluids per every 15 minutes you are working out. If you’re working out for 90 minutes or longer, you’ll also need to replace lost carbohydrates, so a sports drink might be helpful.
Post-workout you’ll also need to pay attention to re-hydration. If you want, you can weigh yourself before and after your workout to see just how much fluid you lost via sweating. If you completed an especially difficult workout, you may have lost a pound or more. For each pound you lost during your workout, you should re-hydrate with three cups of fluid.
A post-workout meal should be consumed within two hours of finishing. You need to replenish your glycogen stores. Typically, consuming 100-200 grams of carbohydrates within two hours of your workout will replenish your glycogen, but a combination of carbohydrates and proteins will be even better. Some studies have shown that consuming a 4:1 ratio of carbs to proteins as a post-workout meal is the most effective way to restore lost glycogen. 
So what tips do you have for proper fueling before, during and after a workout? And what Olympic games have you enjoyed watching the most so far? Share with us on the MyNetDiary Facebook page and Community Forum. 

mynetdiary-blog:

Be An Olympian (Kind Of) with Simple Sports Nutrition

As teams representing their countries compete for gold in London, now is the time to consider the dedication each puts into his or her sport. Training hard is just one aspect of becoming an elite athlete capable of the high-level competition that is the Olympics. Another is proper nutrition and dieting. 

In honor of the London 2012 Summer Olympics, here is a short rundown on how to fuel yourself as an athlete. 

Diversity - The more diverse and balanced diet you can eat, the better your body will fare. You mustn’t skip meals, and remember that carbohydrates, fats and proteins all have a place in your diet. Make sure you’re getting enough of each. 

Several hours before your workout you should have an easily digestible meal. Depending on when you work out, it may mean a light lunch (salad + protein) or a light breakfast (an egg with toast). You should also hydrate throughout the day.

A half hour before your workout is the time to eat a small snack and drink more water. Trail mix is good if you’re planning a workout longer than an hour. For shorter workouts, a banana is a fine choice. 

During your workout, it’s all about staying hydrated. A good rule of thumb is to drink 8 oz. of fluids per every 15 minutes you are working out. If you’re working out for 90 minutes or longer, you’ll also need to replace lost carbohydrates, so a sports drink might be helpful.

Post-workout you’ll also need to pay attention to re-hydration. If you want, you can weigh yourself before and after your workout to see just how much fluid you lost via sweating. If you completed an especially difficult workout, you may have lost a pound or more. For each pound you lost during your workout, you should re-hydrate with three cups of fluid.

A post-workout meal should be consumed within two hours of finishing. You need to replenish your glycogen stores. Typically, consuming 100-200 grams of carbohydrates within two hours of your workout will replenish your glycogen, but a combination of carbohydrates and proteins will be even better. Some studies have shown that consuming a 4:1 ratio of carbs to proteins as a post-workout meal is the most effective way to restore lost glycogen. 

So what tips do you have for proper fueling before, during and after a workout? And what Olympic games have you enjoyed watching the most so far? Share with us on the MyNetDiary Facebook page and Community Forum

3 Essential Ingredients of a Healthy Breakfast

health-heaven:

1. Lean Protein

Gram for gram, protein will help to keep you feeling fuller longer compared to carbohydrates and fat.


2. Whole Grains

To help you stay sharp and focused throughout the morning since they’re slower-burning carbs, plus you’ll get some essential vitamins and minerals.


3. Fruit (or Vegetables)

For more vitamins, minerals and feel-full fiber and to help you knock off at least one of your daily recommended produce servings.

commit2fitness:

muffintop-less:

Muscle & Fitness HERS just put out a food pyramid of their own for those looking to lose fat and build muscle. I like it! Check it out….
 
FAST-DIGESTING CARBS (1 serving)
Fast-digesting carbs (also known as sugar) are generally a no-no, but they play a role in our post-workout diets. Eating them has an immediate effect on insulin levels, and high insulin levels force protein into muscle cells, helping promote recovery and growth.
WHOLE GRAINS (2-3 servings)
Whole-grain carbs not only keep you regular (and aid intestinal health) but also keep blood sugar steady, which, in turn, limits the amount of insulin the body needs.
SUPPLEMENTS (1-4 servings)
Whether it’s your postworkout whey-and-creatine shake, your morning multivitamin, your bedtime casein shake or your daily fish-oil pills, supplements are important for keeping you healthy as well as fit and lean.
FRUITS (1-2 servings)
Full of antioxidants but also carbs (namely fructose), fruit is appropriate primarily first thing in the morning and before workouts.
HEALTHY FATS (4-5 servings)
The beneficial effects of eating healthy fats can’t be overstated. We won’t go into great detail, but here’s a short list: increased muscle growth and strength, reduced muscle breakdown, increased fat loss and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.
VEGETABLES (5-7 servings)
Veggies provide fiber to maintain the health of your gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems, and ample vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients to take care of the rest of your body. Some vegetables such as corn and potatoes are loaded with carbs, so go easy on those.
PROTEIN (5-7, 4-6-ounce servings)
Groundbreaking research published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition in 2000 found that active individuals like HERS readers should ingest 0.7-0.8 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight per day. We recommend getting about 1 gram per pound in 5-7 servings.

commit2fitness:

muffintop-less:

Muscle & Fitness HERS just put out a food pyramid of their own for those looking to lose fat and build muscle. I like it! Check it out….

FAST-DIGESTING CARBS (1 serving)

Fast-digesting carbs (also known as sugar) are generally a no-no, but they play a role in our post-workout diets. Eating them has an immediate effect on insulin levels, and high insulin levels force protein into muscle cells, helping promote recovery and growth.

WHOLE GRAINS (2-3 servings)

Whole-grain carbs not only keep you regular (and aid intestinal health) but also keep blood sugar steady, which, in turn, limits the amount of insulin the body needs.

SUPPLEMENTS (1-4 servings)

Whether it’s your postworkout whey-and-creatine shake, your morning multivitamin, your bedtime casein shake or your daily fish-oil pills, supplements are important for keeping you healthy as well as fit and lean.

FRUITS (1-2 servings)

Full of antioxidants but also carbs (namely fructose), fruit is appropriate primarily first thing in the morning and before workouts.

HEALTHY FATS (4-5 servings)

The beneficial effects of eating healthy fats can’t be overstated. We won’t go into great detail, but here’s a short list: increased muscle growth and strength, reduced muscle breakdown, increased fat loss and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

VEGETABLES (5-7 servings)

Veggies provide fiber to maintain the health of your gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems, and ample vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients to take care of the rest of your body. Some vegetables such as corn and potatoes are loaded with carbs, so go easy on those.

PROTEIN (5-7, 4-6-ounce servings)

Groundbreaking research published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition in 2000 found that active individuals like HERS readers should ingest 0.7-0.8 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight per day. We recommend getting about 1 gram per pound in 5-7 servings.

(via commit2fitness-deactivated20120)

With all the extra exercising everybody seems to be doing lately I thought this post would be a useful reference. 
When you are working your body hard it is so important to get a good source of quality protein, especially into your post workout meal, in order to help your muscles grow and repair. 
 This list is a useful reference, but I would also put it out there: just because you’re a meat eater does not mean you need to rely on the meaty options! Cottage cheese, beans and quinoa are just as nice and add a little variety too! 
Here’s to happy muscle reparation for you all! ;-) 
 

cleaningout:

Omnivore
-Lean Veal/Beef (36g protein / 100g serving)
-Lean Chicken (32.8g protein / 100g serving)
-Fish (Yellowfin Tuna is about 30g / 100g serving, salmon has 27g, Tilapia has 26g)
-Fish eggs (Caviar has 28.6g / 100g serving)
-Lobster and crab (26.4g protein / 100g serving)
-Turkey (33g protein / 4 ounces)
Vegetarian
 -Cheese (41.6g / 100g serving of Parmesan, other cheeses 28-30g protein/100g serving)
 -Cottage cheese (14g protein / 1/2 c. serving) 
-Eggs (1 large egg has 6.3 g protein)
-Milk (8.1 g protein per 1 cup)
-Yogurt (13g protein per 1 cup)
 
Vegan
-Beans (Soybeans/Edamame 39.6g / 100g serving, Lupin 15.6g /100g)
-Roasted seeds (Pumpkin and Squash seeds 33g protein / 100g)
-Yeast extract (Marmite 27.8g protein/ 100g serving)
-Peanuts (25.8g / 100g serving)
-Tofu (10g protein / 1/2 c. serving)
-Oatmeal (6g protein / 1 cup)
-Quinoa (4.3g protein / 1/2 cup)
-Tempeh (31g / 1 cup)
-Spinach (6g / 1 cup)
Click here for a long list of many vegetarian / vegan sources of protein!
With all the extra exercising everybody seems to be doing lately I thought this post would be a useful reference. 

When you are working your body hard it is so important to get a good source of quality protein, especially into your post workout meal, in order to help your muscles grow and repair. 

This list is a useful reference, but I would also put it out there: just because you’re a meat eater does not mean you need to rely on the meaty options! Cottage cheese, beans and quinoa are just as nice and add a little variety too! 

Here’s to happy muscle reparation for you all! ;-) 

cleaningout:

Omnivore

-Lean Veal/Beef (36g protein / 100g serving)

-Lean Chicken (32.8g protein / 100g serving)

-Fish (Yellowfin Tuna is about 30g / 100g serving, salmon has 27g, Tilapia has 26g)

-Fish eggs (Caviar has 28.6g / 100g serving)

-Lobster and crab (26.4g protein / 100g serving)

-Turkey (33g protein / 4 ounces)

Vegetarian

 -Cheese (41.6g / 100g serving of Parmesan, other cheeses 28-30g protein/100g serving)

 -Cottage cheese (14g protein / 1/2 c. serving) 

-Eggs (1 large egg has 6.3 g protein)

-Milk (8.1 g protein per 1 cup)

-Yogurt (13g protein per 1 cup)

 

Vegan

-Beans (Soybeans/Edamame 39.6g / 100g serving, Lupin 15.6g /100g)

-Roasted seeds (Pumpkin and Squash seeds 33g protein / 100g)

-Yeast extract (Marmite 27.8g protein/ 100g serving)

-Peanuts (25.8g / 100g serving)

-Tofu (10g protein / 1/2 c. serving)

-Oatmeal (6g protein / 1 cup)

-Quinoa (4.3g protein / 1/2 cup)

-Tempeh (31g / 1 cup)

-Spinach (6g / 1 cup)

Click here for a long list of many vegetarian / vegan sources of protein!

(via fitblrhappyandhealthy)

Chocolate Quinoa Protein Bars: recipe
OOooooOOOoooooo!! Sounds yummy. :)

Chocolate Quinoa Protein Bars: recipe

OOooooOOOoooooo!! Sounds yummy. :)

(via health-heaven)

Jolly Good Nutrition

I have added a new page to Jollifications to look at nutrition. This was kind of a natural progression that has come from roller derby, to fitness, to health and now nutrition.

I have come to the conclusion that it is all well and good doing exercise and trying to get fitter and stronger, but if you don’t give your body the correct fuel then you are missing a vital piece of the puzzle when it comes to making your body as efficient as it can be.

Now don’t get me wrong, I am a complete foody - I love to cook, I LOVE eating pudding and if there is a piece of cake or a biscuit on offer with my cup of tea then (more often than not) I’m damn well going to take it.

And I don’t worry about this in the slightest. But this is because I think about what goes into my body the rest of the time.

So I am going to use this new page to look at how to build a healthy and balanced base for day to day nutrition (please note that I did not say ‘diet’), examine the different types of nutrition, and look at nutrition with regards to pre and post workout requirements.

This is very much in its infancy so please bare with me, but also be assured that I will be adding things regularly so please take a look and check back in every now and again. Also, any nutrition stuff that goes in my blog will either be added to this page, or a link provided.